Boom followed by bust. The dot com experience is just the latest of many in California’s history. The 1849 Gold Rush caused one of the best known booms followed by inevitable bust, but many other mining areas have experienced the same and after the bust the whole population may move away leaving behind a ghost town. Because the Californian economy is strong, some of the ghost towns are .......well.....not quite as ghostly as you might expect, and one is now more theme park than ghost town. Nevertheless, there are some great ghost towns in California, including our favourite, Bodie.

 

 

Snow around buildings, Bodie ghost town

The winter weather at Bodie can be pretty bad. We managed to get there only a few days after the road was opened in spring, no mean feat in a 2 wheel drive car considering that the last part of the road is unsurfaced (unpaved). This picture shows what we found, the  James Stuart Cain Home still surrounded by deep snow. Cain arrived in Bodie at the age of 25 and became the richest man and largest landowner in the town. Click Tab 2 to see the Cain Home in rather better weather.

 

Interior of Boone Store & Warehouse, Bodie Ghost Town

Built in 1879 this store was owned by Harvey Boone a direct descendant of Daniel Boone. In 1884 fire came close to the store but it survived and hence we can still enjoy this wonderful and authentic example of an old-style General Store. To preserve the interiors of the buildings and their contents access is not permitted but you can see plenty through the windows.

 

 Post Office, Odd Fellows Lodge, Miners Union Hall & Morgue, Bodie State Historic Park, CA, USA.jpg
 Union Inn, Volcano, CA, USA
 Interior of store, Bodie Ghost Town, CA, USA

 

 Snow round buildings, Bodie ghost town, CA, USA
 Calico Ghost Town from viewpoint, CA, USA
Ghost Towns 349
Next

Ghost Towns

Click on Minimap to navigate

Home > US States > The West > California >

 Former Bull, Baker & Co Premises, Shasta State Historic Park, CA, USA

Former Bull, Baker & Co Premises, Shasta

We have visited many Ghost Towns and got used to a long drive over unsurfaced (unpaved) roads to reach the ones that are truly deserted. Shasta is an exception to the rule as it sits on the busy Route 299 west of Redding. Founded in the 1849 gold rush it was originally called Reading Springs (pronounced ‘Redding’ as in the UK city). It grew into a supply and shipping centre for the mines until in 1872 the railroad arrived at nearby Redding (yep, they dumbed down the spelling), and sucked all the business away from Shasta. The 1850s brick buildings that line Route 299 are now a State Historic Park with the old Courthouse as its museum.

 

Previous
Ghost Towns 349
Trail continues down the page
Trail continues up the page
Tab 1
Tab 2
- Bodie. It is the best preserved ghost town in California, if not in all of the USA.
- For those unable or unwilling to drive gravel roads, Shasta is a good example of a ghost town.
- The increasing popularity of Bodie. When we visited back in 1981 there was hardly anyone else there, by 2009 it was busy and Jen was accosted to do a TV interview.
TrailbarCA
Our View
We like 5
But not 5

To move forwards or backwards through the California  trail click the arrows above, or select your next destination on the Minimap.

DLU100604

Union Inn, Volcano

Next we have a ghost town that isn’t completely ghostly. Volcano is a town from the Gold Rush era that is thought to have gained its name from the local crater-like terrain, although some think it was a result of frequent eruptions of violence in the gold rush days. Today it is a partial ghost town with many ruined buildings, but there is still a population of around 100 and plenty of buildings that are still occupied. The St George Hotel and the Post Office are still fully functioning. The Union Inn was built in 1880 as the Union Billiard Saloon and Boarding House and it has now been restored as an Inn. 

Calico Ghost Town

And now for a ‘Ghost Town’ Theme Park. Calico was a real 1880’s silver and borax mining town that died then was reborn as a tourist attraction. In the mid 1890’s silver prices dropped making the mines at Calico uneconomic and borax mining wound down from 1907 so by the mid 1920’s it was a ghost town. A few stayed behind which helped to preserve the town then in 1951 the town was bought by Walter Knott (of Knott’s Berry Farm). He restored Calico then in 1966 he donated the town to San Bernadino County. About a third of Calico is original but the rest is reconstructed.  While it lacks the authenticity of Bodie, it does offer a lot of fun.

Bodie Ghost Town

Our favourite ghost town is situated close to the border with Nevada along a road that is partly unsurfaced (unpaved). William S Bodey (the spelling of his name varies) discovered gold near here in 1859 and by 1880 Bodie had a population of over 10,000. Thereafter the mines and the town began  a long decline with the last mine closing in 1942. The town was never totally abandoned and those that stayed helped to ensure that the abandoned buildings were not looted. In 1962 it became a State Historic Park and the ghost town is now maintained in a state of “arrested decay”. This picture shows (from left to right) the Post Office, Odd Fellows Lodge, Miners Union Hall and the Morgue.

Previous
Next
State Page
california minimapMexicoArizonaJoshua Tree National ParkHawaiiSan DiegoPalm Springs areaLos AngelesCalifornia Ghost TownsKings Canyon & Sequoia National ParkDeath Valley National ParkUtahYosemite National ParkCalifornia CoastCalifornia MissionsEastern SierraNevadaIdahoOregonGold Country California Wine CountrySacramentoLassen Volcanic National ParkRedwood National ParkSan FranciscoEast Bay
california minimapMexicoArizonaJoshua Tree National ParkHawaiiSan DiegoPalm Springs areaLos AngelesCalifornia Ghost TownsKings Canyon & Sequoia National ParkDeath Valley National ParkUtahYosemite National ParkCalifornia CoastCalifornia MissionsEastern SierraNevadaIdahoOregonGold Country California Wine CountrySacramentoLassen Volcanic National ParkRedwood National ParkSan FranciscoEast Bay

 

© Mike & Jen Elsden 1981 - 2018

The contents of this page may not be reproduced in full or in part without permission

Oh! Canada Home
50 Plus DC Home